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Any coin collectors on Tigernet?
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Any coin collectors on Tigernet?


May 21, 2024, 8:49 AM
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I know nothing about coins. I came across these 2 Eisenhower bicentennial dollars. Neither have the mint marks. There is silver in them. Thanks in advance and Tmail me if you are legitimate collector. Just curious

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Who put the "L" in BrowneLL


Re: Any coin collectors on Tigernet?

1

May 21, 2024, 9:05 AM
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If they're uncirculated, they're worth about 10 bucks. Circulated, probably much less, whatever the silver value is presumably, which ain't that much. Still, they're cool. I have a little collection of coins in a jar, from handfuls of quarters mostly that I've looked through at car washes. Oldest quarter is a 1967, which isn't worth anything but it's just kind of cool to hold a coin that's been around nearly as long as I've been around. I've actually held up better because nobody's stuck gum on me at any point.

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Re: Any coin collectors on Tigernet?

1

May 21, 2024, 9:17 AM
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Check ebay for prices. Usually a pretty good idea of value. The circulated one is not worth very much.

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Re: Any coin collectors on Tigernet?

1

May 21, 2024, 9:33 AM
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I would classify that as an entry-level collectible. The glaring issue is the heavy circulation marks. The only value in that coin is intrinsic. It’s still fairly common because they minted so many. It’s kinda cool because it’s the bicentennial.

I do collect coins but mostly pure rare metal rounds or numismatics that have high rare metal content. Really anything including ingots and the like. Anything pre-1964 has some silver value in them unless it’s a nickel. Basically things I can add to my 401k and still physically hold. Which is getting harder to do.

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As a Numismatist

3

May 21, 2024, 9:36 AM
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I demand change.

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"I've played multiple sports and would bet any amount that I'm still more athletic than you at this present time...."


I used to be. Coin collecting brings up a painful memory. When my parents

9

May 21, 2024, 9:43 AM
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house burned to the ground in 1977, I had just moved out a couple of weeks before, down to the Charleston area for my first job. But, my coin collections had been left behind, in a kitchen cabinet. Coin "books" with the individual cutouts for pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters, along with a quart jar FULL of silver coins. All silver, prior to 1965.

After the house fire, I was able to find the remains of them, as I knew exactly where they had been. It is amazing how stuff falls to the earth in a fire. Pennies were still in rows, the books having burned from around them. The Miracle Whip jar full of silver coins had melted into one huge glob of silver, That is what makes the memory painful. My younger self wasn't even thinking of the bullion value of the silver itself, it just knew that all those coins were melted, ruined. I left the glob in the ashes, and it got bulldozed into the swamp eventually with the rest of the house remains. Several POUNDS of silver.

My parents had a big old Mosler safe that had been in the closet in their bedroom, and although the dial and handle, which were brass, had melted away, the safe itself was intact. My younger brother and I hooked a wrecker cable on it, hoisted it out of the ashes (three days after the fire, ashes still too hot to stand in!), and spent over two hours hosing it down with water to make it cool enough to touch. We later figured out it took so long because the walls of the safe were reinforced with six inches of concrete.

Our parents had still not been found, they had gone on vacation somewhere up in the mountains, we thought North Carolina. The highway patrol eventually found them via the DMV vehicle info in northern Virginia, instead. My brother and I wanted to spare them the heartache of finding out that the safe contents, along with everything else, had been destroyed in the fire. So, we set about burning the door off its hinges with a torch, and cracked it open with a crowbar.

What we found was that the safe had done its job of being fireproof, and the contents inside were unharmed. Well, almost. There were some coins inside, about a dozen silver dollars, and three Kennedy half dollars. When the safe tumbled to the ground when the floor burnt out from under it, a 1964 Kennedy half had fallen into the crack around the door of the safe. Heat from the outside had melted and distorted one tiny edge of it. I carried that 50 cent piece around in my pocket for many years for good luck. It still resides in a desk drawer in my bedroom.

Since I was the only coin collector in the family, when our parents both died, I asked for those coins as part of my share of the estate. I still have all of them. They are FAR more valuable to me than their value as coins, or as silver. They are a bridge to my past, and that of my parents. I have no idea what made them keep those few, particular coins. And, that is what makes them precious to me, the fact that they kept them.

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Followup, there is one cool thing about two of the silver dollars I have. Two of

2

May 21, 2024, 10:02 AM
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them are 1921 dates. But, they are COMPLETELY different coins. One is a "Morgan" dollar, which was minted from 1878 through 1904, and again for part of one year only in 1921. The second one is the "Peace" dollar, which was minted from 1921 to 1928, 1934 though 1935, and for collectors only beginning in 2021.

The only other instance I can think of where coins of completely different design appear in the same year is 1909, which was the last year of "Indian Head" pennies, and the first year of "Lincoln" cents. I also find it fascinating that the Indian Heads are almost always referred to as pennies by collectors, while the Lincolns are almost always referred to as cents. What can I say, coin collecting can be strange. I am sure some REAL coin aficionados will correct me and point out other instances of different coins with same year dates.

:)

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Where is said swamp the silver globe got pushed into, 76er?

2

May 21, 2024, 11:21 AM [ in reply to I used to be. Coin collecting brings up a painful memory. When my parents ]
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Out of general curiosity? (Taps shovel on ground anxiously)

That sucks, but fortunate not everything was lost & you was able to save your parents' stuff at least.

My folks had a coin jar on the mantle at house I grew up in...had some special stuff mixed in - wheat pennies, some constitutional silver (the 1964 & earlier coinage that's 90% silver), even had a Buffalo nickel. When my folks built/moved into their new house, that jar was still sitting w/ the stuff left in old house - someone got in there & stole it before we could get our hands on it to move it. Got some coins me & my dad pulled out grandparents' safe after my grandma passed few years back that need to go thru & see if any of it is constitutional silver.

Not really collecting, but I've got some troy ounce golf & silver bars from when I worked at mine in Kershaw & since pandemic, I've got into gold & silver stacking to have something on hand in case s&#% really hits the fan.

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Don't worry, I webnt and searched all over there in later years with my metal


May 21, 2024, 12:34 PM
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detector. Never got a sniff.

:(

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D@mn


May 21, 2024, 6:17 PM
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Would've been nice payday now had you found it.

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Re: I used to be. Coin collecting brings up a painful memory. When my parents

1

May 22, 2024, 4:00 PM [ in reply to I used to be. Coin collecting brings up a painful memory. When my parents ]
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Was there anything in the safe other than the few coins?

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Useless 30 year old bank statements and the like. They did have some cash in


May 22, 2024, 5:19 PM
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there, though, nice to see it was not burnt up.

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Quick Google Search netted this

2

May 21, 2024, 9:45 AM
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https://www.pcgs.com/news/how-to-tell-type-1-and-type-2-bicentennial-dollars-apart

Hope that helps answer some of your questions.

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Re: Any coin collectors on Tigernet?

1

May 21, 2024, 9:52 AM
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There is no silver in them, despite still hearing them colloquially referred to as "silver dollars." They are a copper slug with a nickel cladding. No U.S. coins minted for general circulation have silver now, though you do see silver, as well as gold, used in special collectible mintings, such as the Olympic coin sets.
The attached photo of an Ike dollar next to an 1896 Morgan uncirculated silver dollar doesn't do justice to the difference in sheen between the two.
I collected for years, but for the last 25-30 years, it has been more accurate to say I am a guy with a collection rather than a guy who is a collector.
If you look at the edge of the coins, you can easily pick out the coin which has a copper core.

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Lucky Johnson


Re: Any coin collectors on Tigernet?

1

May 21, 2024, 10:52 AM
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I saw an advertisement for an app which lets you scan the coin to tell it's value. Not sure if it is a free app or if it works well but might be worth a try.

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Re: Any coin collectors on Tigernet?


May 22, 2024, 3:49 PM
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I collect Gold coins. Most of them worth about $20 bucks over spot value of the gold in them.

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Re: Any coin collectors on Tigernet?


May 22, 2024, 5:03 PM
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Sorry to hear that your house burned down but some story

I was a coin collector as a child but not since. Still have them many moons later. Probably not worth a lot but I enjoyed it when I was young.

Still like looking for old coins in my change and every now and then find one.

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Re: Any coin collectors on Tigernet?


May 22, 2024, 5:46 PM
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Yep. Same here. When I was a kid, I found a lot of old cirulated coins but much less through the years.

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Re: Any coin collectors on Tigernet?


May 23, 2024, 8:51 AM
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I’ll buy all the 1909 S VDB Lincoln copper pennys you have for thousands above face value!!!

When I was a kid I began a coin collection in the 1950’s and this penny could be bought for about twenty bucks. Not Today !

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